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National Weather Service explains severe weather at Spotter Class in Salem

National Weather Service explains severe weather at Spotter Class in Salem

National Weather Service Senior Meteorologist Fred Glass presents a severe weather and storm spotter course at the Marion County Fair Exhibit Building in Salem Thursday night.

There were 65 in attendance at a National Weather Service spotter class held at the Marion County Fair Exhibit building Thursday night.

Senior Meteorologist Fred Glass says they receive a lot of false tornado reports.

“Rotation is the key thing.  A lot of times things that get called in falsely there is no rotation to them they are just scary looking clouds as we like to call them that hang down.”

Glass says trained spotters are essential for determining the degree of danger from a severe storm.

“Even if you were within 10 or 20 miles of our radar the beam is a lot lower than it is say here around Salem.  We need the ground information, the spotters to tell us visually what’s going on with the storms, what they are seeing…those are vital to the warning process that goes on at the weather service.”

Glass says with advancements in technology they are now able to begin pinpointing potential areas of severe weather two days out instead of the one day that had been the limit in the past He recommended whenever a watch is listed indicating severe weather is a possibility that everyone has plans in place in the event the severe storms developed. Glass says you should always have a few options available for receiving several weather updates.

Some of those attending the session received spotter certificates and were registered with the National Weather Service.

National Weather Service Seminar draws 65 at the Marion County Fair Exhibit Building.