• IStock/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) -- A computer glitch that grounded 2,500 American Airlines flights and left passengers stranded for days at a major U.S. airport has now been “stabilized” but it could still take days to sort out the mess, according to the airline.Between 200 and 1,000 passengers have been sleeping at the Charlotte Douglas International Airport in Charlotte, North Carolina, since flights were forced to be canceled starting last Thursday after American’s regional carrier, PSA Airlines, suffered two computer glitches.“It was canceled four times,” an angry passenger told ABC News.“Every time they book us, wait about a half an hour and it's canceled,” another passenger told ABC News.One woman got so frustrated that she broke a window and luggage separated from their owners began piling up.The glitches have affected an estimated 125,000 passengers, according to the airline. Applications that help schedule flight movement and crew staffing, which ordinarily takes a few seconds, took hours. As a result, planes and passengers were barely moving until the fix was finalized Monday night.“It's not a cyber-security issue. It's a hardware IT applications issue,” said Katie Cody, an American Airlines spokesperson.Passengers continue to struggle with delays.“We're tired. We're ready to go home,” a passenger told ABC News. “There's a group of 17 and we can't get a rental."While the problems were fixed, the airline doesn’t expect it to get back to normal operations until Thursday.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Three major retailers have announced that they will no longer sell paint strippers or other products containing a chemical that has been linked to dozens of accidental deaths.Home Depot, Sherman Williams and Lowe's all have announced that they will no longer sell products containing methylene chloride. The Centers for Disease Control has found several people have died while using products that contain the chemical to refinish bathtubs, specifically when individuals inhaled fumes that collected in the tub.In a 2012 report, the CDC said products with methylene chloride were an "extreme hazard" for professional bathtub refinishers and do-it-yourselfers who can buy the products online or at hardware stores. The CDC confirmed that 13 deaths in 11 years were caused by inhaling fumes from those products.The Environmental Protection Agency has been looking into the risks from methylene chloride for several years but has not finalized a rule to limit use of the chemical.A group that has been campaigning to ban the chemical called Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families, said at least 64 people have died from exposure to methylene chloride since 1980.Health advocates have said the EPA has taken too long to take action on the chemical and petitioned retailers to stop selling products they believe are dangerous.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- For most hotel guests, checking out is an afterthought. It’s the last thing you have to do before heading home. But knowing what not to do at checkout and properly preparing for it can turn a potentially heated situation into a quick “thank you and goodbye.” Below, we compiled a list of eight things you should avoid doing at hotel checkout.1. Don’t be late to checkout.The first rule of checking out? Don’t be late. Just like rental car companies that charge for an extra day when you return the car a few minutes after due time, hotels may tack on an outrageously high price for being just a half-hour late. If you’re rushing back to the hotel and know you won’t make the cutoff time, it never hurts to call ahead and try to negotiate away a potential charge.2. Don’t forget to double check the room and safe.In addition to leaving the room on time, make sure you don’t leave anything behind. You may want to check under the bed for that lost sock and the bathroom outlet for your phone charger. If you have an early flight or checkout time, pack up as much as you can the night before so that last-minute rush isn’t too harried. Also, be sure to take out anything you were keeping in the room safe. If you’re staying at a hotel where you need to leave your passport at the front desk, you may want to get it back before checking out, if possible.3. Don’t forget to tip the housekeepers.Though easy to forget, it’s always polite to leave some money for the people keeping your room clean. If it helps, write yourself a Post-it note reminder.4. Don’t ignore the itemized bill.You may be in a rush to get through checkout, but give the itemized bill a careful look so you understand why the hotel charge is different than the room rate you initially booked. Some hotel executives intentionally advertise low room rates, knowing the property will make up the difference with fees that only appear at checkout. Yes, it’s a smarmy practice, but you should be on the lookout or you might get grifted.5. Don’t be surprised by hidden charges.Anyone who has stayed in a hotel in the past 10 or so years has likely been presented with an itemized bill that has an unexpected fee. Many New York hotels located near Times Square are now charging an extra $25 destination fee. Some properties add on a resort fee for amenities -- even when you’re not staying the resort. Then, there’s the obnoxious restocking fee for those macadamia nuts you ate when you couldn’t bring yourself to walk a block to find food. Research the fees your hotel charges before you book your stay. The property should clearly spell out the fees they add to the bill, and if it’s not, you can push back on any surprise charges.6. Don’t freak out.Spitting venom at the assistant manager standing behind the front desk probably won’t help when dealing with an unexpected line item on the bill. Anyone working at checkout likely knows what fees can and can’t be adjusted. Being empathetic about how difficult it can be to deal with annoyed customers will likely go much further than screaming about the unfair fees. If the Wi-Fi or resort fee wasn’t disclosed beforehand, it’s possible you may be able to get it waived. You can also try to dispute a charge later through your credit card company.7. Don’t pay with cash or a debit card.Many hotel guests don’t even realize they’ve been snookered with an unexpected charge until they’re about to throw their itemized receipt into the trash at home. Disputing your bill after paying with cash is a lot harder than working with a credit card company to get a chargeback. If you pay with a debit card, you may not have the protection to challenge a charge. Also, some identity thieves like to target hotel guests. Most credit card companies are set up to detect suspicious behavior, but s
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  • Yuma County Detention Center(YUMA, Ariz.) -- Police in Arizona thought they were busting an ordinary case of a fraudulent return this week until some digging revealed that the same 23-year-old man has perpetrated the scheme at thousands of Walmart stores across the country.Police in Yuma, Arizona, said they responded to a case of a fraudulent return on Wednesday afternoon in which a person bringing a computer back to Walmart had allegedly removed parts of the computer before putting it back in the box and taking it back to the store.Upon investigation, the Yuma Police Department found that the same man had pulled the same scheme at a different Walmart earlier in the day.Thomas Frudaker, 23, was arrested and booked into Yuma County Adult Detention Facility.Yuma police said Frudaker pulled similar schemes at more than 1,000 Walmart stores across the country over the past 18 months and caused a monetary loss of approximately $1.3 million to Walmart.Frudaker was charged with six felonies, including two counts of theft, two counts of fraudulent schemes and artifices, and two counts of criminal damage.He is due in court on Monday.Frudaker is being held at Yuma County Detention Center on $40,000 bond.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- From its humble beginning as a small newspaper to what is now a full-fledged sports media company, Barstool Sports is one of the most popular brands for men, but it’s a woman who’s calling the shots.Erika Nardini, the first CEO of Barstool Sports and only the second female employee in the company’s at-times tumultuous history, has taken the controversial site to new heights.“I was the last candidate I think to come along,” she told ABC News’ Rebecca Jarvis in an interview on “Nightline.” “Over 70 were men -- But I think there was something that clicked with me and Barstool.”
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- JetBlue has returned to its full flight schedule to Puerto Rico, nearly nine months after Hurricane Maria, the airline announced Friday.The return to full capacity comes six months ahead of schedule, totaling 48 daily flights between the United States and the Caribbean island, the airline said.JetBlue, which is the island’s largest carrier, hired an additional 50 staffers for San Juan.“Our return to our pre-hurricane flight count is a testament to the incredible resilience of Puerto Rico and our crewmembers who kept flights operating during a very difficult period,” said Dave Clark, JetBlue’s vice president sales and revenue management, said in a statement.The Puerto Rican government says that commercial flights to the island are back to normal daily capacity. The island, which depends greatly on tourism, was devastated after Hurricane Maria made landfall on Sept. 20, 2017.About 15 percent of hotels are still not operating, according to the Puerto Rican Tourism Company.“The fact that JetBlue has been able to match seat capacity levels to pre-hurricane figures six months earlier than expected shows that demand has increased and that we are on track for a historic recovery," said Carla G. Campos, executive director of the Puerto Rico Tourism Company. "Likewise, the creation of 50 new jobs as a result of the increase in operations is a testament to the trust and commitment that JetBlue has with Puerto Rico.”There are still 6,224 customers are without power in Puerto Rico, according to the island’s electric power authority. The agency’s new chief told the Associated Press in early June that it would take up to two months to restore power to the entire island.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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