• ASOS(NEW YORK) -- Now, you can actually color on your face with Crayola crayons!Crayola just released a makeup line in partnership with ASOS and, in true Crayola fashion, it features 98 very colorful shades.There are 58 pieces for sale, including face crayons, mascaras, highlighter crayons, face and eyeshadow palettes and various different shades of lip and cheek crayons. Prices range from $14.50 to $40.00 and ASOS says the products are “all vegan” -- even the makeup brushes! The packaging also features Crayola’s iconic crayon box branding and crayon names -- it’s bringing out the inner kid in all of us.From mermaid eyeshadow palettes to the electric blue mascara, the makeup line is tickling us pink.So go color outside the lines and “Go Play” with some of these awesome finds that are sure to liven up your makeup bag!These products were curated by our "Good Morning America" editorial team. "GMA" has affiliate partnerships, so we will get a small share of revenue from your purchases through these links. All product prices are determined by the retailer and subject to change. By visiting these websites, you will leave GoodMorningAmerica.com and any information you share with the retailer will be governed by its website's terms and conditions and privacy policies.
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  • @gerber/Instagram(NEW YORK) -- The original Gerber baby and Gerber's 2018 spokesbaby, Lucas Warren, recently posed in a photo that's tugging at heart strings.Ann Turner Cook, 91, who's still portrayed in the brand's iconic trademark logo, recently met Lucas and his family.The Warrens said that Cook and Lucas "immediately bonded.""Lucas walked right up to her, flashing his signature smile and waving, and we could tell he loved her right away," the Warrens told ABC News in a statement Wednesday. "He even grabbed a cookie and offered to share it with her, which she accepted! Ann Turner Cook is truly a wonderful woman and pleasure to be around, and we couldn’t be more grateful that she took the time to meet with our family."Gerber posted a photo of the encounter on the company's Instagram page Tuesday. The Warrens were on a trip near Cook's home and asked if Gerber could arrange the meeting, the company told ABC News in a statement."Gerber saw this as the perfect opportunity for the two iconic Gerber babies to meet in person," a spokesperson wrote in an email. "As you can see in this photo, Ann Turner Cook and Lucas were all smiles when they met!"Lucas Warren was revealed as the Gerber Spokesbaby 2018 in February. He also has Down syndrome.But Gerber said that's not why he was chosen.Bernadette Tortorella, senior media manager for Gerber, told Good Morning America that Lucas was chosen from 140,000 entries for "the twinkle in his eye and his rosy cheeks," along with his sparkling personality.Lucas' mother, Cortney Warren of Dalton, Georgia, told GMA at the time that when she was "completely shocked" when she found out Lucas had been selected. She described Lucas as "very energetic, loves to make others laugh. He's never met a stranger."Jason Warren called his son being chosen "an honor.""He has a platform to spread joy to everyone and we can't wait to see how much he changes people’s perception on what it means to be a baby with Down syndrome," he said. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Pier Marco Tacca/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The head of Qatar Airways apologized on Tuesday after suggesting that only a man is capable of doing his job as chief executive of the airline.Qatar Airways CEO Akbar Al Baker reportedly made the comments after a reporter asked him about the lack of gender diversity in the Middle Eastern aviation sector, saying his position would be much too challenging for a woman.According to Bloomberg, Al Baker told reporters that Qatar Airways “has to be led by a man, because it is a very challenging position.”Al Baker, who was also appointed chair of the International Air Transport Association this week, offered his “heartfelt apologies” in a statement on Tuesday, but he claimed his comments had been “sensationalized.”“I would like to offer my heartfelt apologies for any offence caused by my comment yesterday, which runs counter to my track record of expanding the role of women in leadership throughout the Qatar Airways Group,” Al Baker, 56, said in a statement posted on Twitter. “Qatar Airways firmly believes in gender equality in the workplace and our airline has been a pioneer in our region in this regard.”The company says about 44 percent of its workforce consists of women and claims to be the first airline to employ female pilots and engineers.Al Baker’s initial remarks, which he said were a joke, contrast with efforts by many international airlines who have launched initiatives to diversify the predominantly male aviation industry.Al Baker clarified his position in an interview on Tuesday, before the company issues its statement.“I was only referring to one individual,” he said in an interview with Bloomberg Television. “I was not referring to the staff in general.”When asked if he would support a female CEO, he said: “It will be my pleasure to have a female CEO candidate I could then develop to become CEO after me.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Drew Angerer/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- It is a sudden loss for fashion lovers obsessed with the woman who dressed us in bright colors, polka dots and fun fashion -- Kate Spade.The 55-year-old designer was found dead in her New York City apartment Tuesday just hours after the fashion community gathered at this year's CFDA Fashion Awards. She apparently took her own life, police sources confirmed to ABC News.Spade was known for statement handbags in the shape of flamingos, apples, frogs, crabs, snails and pineapples. She created dresses that flowed in a summer's breeze and ones that stiffened for the boardroom. Her shoes provided a coquettish end to any outfit.The Kansas City, Missouri native initially had a passion for journalism when she began her career, obtaining a degree in the field from Arizona State University.A year later, in 1986, she started working in the fashion accessories department at Mademoiselle magazine, where her maiden name, Katy Brosnahan, appeared on the masthead. And in a title change that proves she knew fashion intimately, she left the magazine in 1991 as senior fashion editor.Finding love in her life would also create for her an eponymous fashion house.Spade met her now-husband Andy Spade, the brother of actor David Spade, and together they founded her line of handbags in 1993.Years later, her dream -- and offerings -- would expand into hundreds of Kate Spade New York stores in North America and in Japan, with her products on shelves in more than 450 stores worldwide. By 2015, Spade sold her company to shoe designer Stuart Weitzman for $574 million. Tapestry, previously known as Coach, Inc., later acquired the company for $2.4 billion.Recently, Spade moved on to launch a new luxury brand, Frances Valentine. She was so committed to the idea of bringing new luxury shoes and handbags to market that she even legally changed her name to Kate Valentine Spade.For all that she had built in business, Spade made her role as a mother to her now 13-year-old daughter her top priority. The designer, who'd often boast about not having professional help, took time off from leading her fashion house to raise her. And she made sure that her company helped working mothers like herself.Mary Breech, the chief marketing officer, told blog Hey Mama last year that Kate Spade was an "inclusive" place to be a working mom."Kate Spade & Company is a great place to be a mom," she said. "Leaving my children for so many hours each week isn’t easy, but I am honestly able to say without hesitation that I love what I do, the people I work with, and the things I work on."But it didn't mean motherhood was without stress for Spade."Being a mother adds an enormous amount of stress to your life. You need to make sure you’re there for everything. We don’t have other people to do it for us — I want to make sure I’m there," she told The Cut in 2016. "When you’re trying to be a parent and a businessperson at the same time, that is the most stressful thing you could do."Spade never strayed too far from her magazine days, penning four books. Her latest, "Muses, Visionaries and Madcap Heroines," was a coffee table book, featuring real and fictional heroines like onscreen fashion icons Carrie Bradshaw of "Sex and the City" and Cher Horowitz of "Clueless."The designer, who was in the midst of building her Frances Valentine label, spent "exhausting" mornings sipping Diet Pepsi while trying very hard to get it all done, she told The Cut in 2016."I’m a little OCD," she told the site. "I turn on all the lights, get everything going, start making breakfast. I slowly wake up my daughter up — I give her a little nudge every ten minutes. I swear to god, it’s so exhausting."Spade continued, "I feed the dog; I feed the fish. My husband, Andy, runs to Starbucks because he doesn’t want any part of that banter. I’m in my daughter’s room going, 'Oh my god, I asked you 20 minutes ago and y
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  • Andrew Toth/FilmMagic via GettyImages(NEW YORK) -- Fashion designer Kate Spade -- who started her namesake company in 1993 and grew it into a massive empire including clothes, jewelry, perfume and furniture -- was found dead in her New York City apartment Tuesday morning after apparently taking her own life, police sources said.The 55-year-old's body was found around 10 a.m. at her Park Avenue apartment on the Upper East Side of Manhattan by a housekeeper, the sources said. She apparently hanged herself on her bedroom doorknob using a scarf.A suicide note was left at the scene, but police officials declined to disclose its contents."The contents of that note, as well as the physical state of the apartment and the comments of the witness, lend to the credibility that it is an apparent suicide," said Dermot Shea, chief of detectives for the New York City Police Department.Spade's former company issued a statement saying her death was "incredibly sad news.""Although Kate has not been affiliated with the brand for more than a decade, she and her husband and creative partner, Andy, were the founders of our beloved brand," the company's statement reads. "Kate will be dearly missed. Our thoughts are with Andy and the entire Spade family at this time."Spade and her husband, the brother of actor and comedian David Spade, have a 13-year-old daughter.Born Katherine Noel Brosnahan in Kansas City, Missouri, Spade graduated from Arizona State University in 1985 with a degree in journalism. She got her start in fashion working for Mademoiselle magazine in the fashion accessories department.By the time she left Mademoiselle in 1991, she had risen on the magazine's masthead to senior fashion editor and head of accessories. While working at Mademoiselle, she noticed there was a need for stylish handbags, but it was her husband who convinced her to set out to fill the void."At the time, bags were too complicated, and I really loved very simple kind of architectural shapes," Spade said last year on the NPR show "How I Built This with Guy Raz.""I would wear these very simple shapes, none of which were famous designers. I mean, they were no-names," she said. "If someone were to say, 'Whose is that?' I'd say, 'I don't know. I bought it at a vintage store or it's a straw bag I got in Mexico.' And they were all very square and simple and I thought, 'Gosh, why can't we find something just clean and simple and modern.'"In January 1993, she and Andy Spade, an advertising executive she married in 1994, launched their company out of their apartment in New York City and called it, simply, "Kate Spade Handbags.""I was not Kate Spade. I was Kate Brosnahan, and I kept coming up with these names, and Andy kept saying 'Kate Spade' because we were 50-50 partners," she told NPR.They went from initially making burlap bags with raffia fringe and webbing handles to manufacturing colorful leather rectangular handbags that fashion editors and fashionistas loved. By 1998, the company's annual revenue reached $27 million.A year later, the Neiman Marcus Group purchased 56 percent of Kate Spade New York for about $30 million."She has a brand loyalty like none I have ever seen," Hitha Herzog, chief research officer of H Squared Research, told ABC News. "There are women who started carrying her tote bag in 1997 and are still wearing her stuff now. It's one of those brands that has generational loyalty. Despite Kate, sadly, not being alive anymore, her brand name and brand loyalty will continue."Herzog, who covers Tapestry, the company that acquired the Kate Spade fashion house, credited the designer with being a role model for a younger generation."As others came through the ranks they looked to her to see how she was able to navigate the world of retail," Herzog said. "What she created will always be a foundation in the industry. This is a brand that women between the ages of 20 to 34 have gravitated toward, starting from 1993 to now, when you see everyone from news anchors
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- If you want to curb your kids’ screen time or your own, you have an unlikely ally in the battle against phone addiction.Apple’s latest software update, iOS 12, will come with new tools to help users control the amount of time they spend on their iPhones and iPads.Here are the basics:More 'Do Not Disturb' featuresThe iPhone's Do Not Disturb feature will be enhanced, including new options that will automatically end Do Not Disturb based on a specified time or location.A new Do Not Disturb during Bedtime mode will dim the phone's display and hide all notifications on the lock screen until you prompt it in the morning.Activity reportsA Screen Time feature will create daily and weekly Activity Reports that show how much time a user spends in each app, across categories of apps, how many notifications they receive and how many times they check their iPhone or iPad.App Limits will allow users to set a limit for how much time they want to spend in an app and receive notifications when that time is about to expire, another helpful feature for parents.Downtime is another tool for parents that will allow them to partially disable their child's device for a period of time, like bedtime or school.When Downtime is turned on, notifications from apps will not appear and a badge will appear on apps that are not allowed to be used. Parents will also be able to choose the apps they want to make available to their kids all the time.The Screen Time features work with Family Sharing and are account-based, so parents can configure the settings remotely for their child's devices.NotificationsYou will be able to manage app notifications more easily and with more options.You can choose Grouped Notifications to be able to manage and view multiple notifications at one time, and choose to send notifications directly to Notification Center so you don't get a ping every time.Siri will also be empowered to "intelligently make suggestions for notifications settings," according to Apple.What prompted the new features?Details of the iOS 12 software update -- available later this month in public beta form -- were announced Monday at Apple’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference, or WWDC18, at the McEnery Convention Center in San Jose, California.“[It] is interesting because Apple is trying to sell you the screen and trying to minimize it,” said Rebecca Jarvis, ABC News' chief business, technology and economic correspondent. “Ultimately, Apple might be able to sell more phones by telling people, ‘Our phones come with these structures that allow you to not spend so much time on your phone.’”A survey released in May by Pew Research Center found that 95 percent of teens in the United States have access to a smartphone, and 45 percent say they are online "almost constantly."Two Apple shareholders sent an open letter in June asking the company to take on phone addiction among children.Earlier this year Apple added a new "Families" section to its website that has information for parents on the tools available to monitor their kids' device usage.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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