• TongRo Images/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Whether you're laid-back or energetic, there’s a workout fit for your personality."No matter your personality type, there is a workout for you, so no excuses," Dr. Tania Elliott, a New York-based allergist and preventive health expert at EHE, told Good Morning America."There are various things you can do with your doctor to talk about your everyday life to keep you living and keep you happy and healthy every day," Elliott said. "We focus on what you think, how you move and how you eat.”Elliott -- along with celebrity fitness trainer Amanda Kloots, the creator behind explosive workouts such as The Rope, The Dance and The Body -- shared workout routines designed for different personalities with Good Morning America.Kloots' signature workout classes target and tone using high-energy movements, fast-paced cardio intervals and jump rope."In order to be successful, we want to make sure that whatever physical activity you choose, it's consistent with your personality type and what you like to do," Elliott said.
    Read more...
  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- As the school year winds down, opioid prevention in schools are trending up.One in 7 high school students in America reported they'd misused prescription opioids, like hydrocodone, in the past year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.In Ashland, Kentucky a community of just over 21,000 people along the southern bank of the Ohio River, the epidemic has hit a fever pitch.Boyd County, where Ashland is located, saw 39 opioid-related deaths in 2017, which was an increase from 30 deaths in 2016, according to the local paper The Daily Independent.In one year, local elementary schools found a total of 18 needles in their playgrounds.To combat the epidemic, students from Ashland Middle School came up with a device to keep people safe from syringes discarded on the ground.They designed a working prototype to safely pick up and dispose of syringes and created a database to alert the public where the syringes were found."We really noticed that this was a big problem in our community and our resource officer came to us and asked if we could figure out a solution," Isaac Crawford, an eighth-grader at Ashland Middle School and one of the 19 students who worked on creating the device, told ABC News.On a recent trip to Washington, D.C., the students showcased their device to lawmakers in COngress. Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell, from their home state of Kentucky, called it "inspirational."The Ashland police chief saw the prototype and wants it in the hands of every officer "as soon as possible," Crawford said.The students won a nationwide contest sponsored on by Samsung - which supplied the 3D printing technology to create the prototype.The database locates where needles were found and then reports them to police and vice versa. The hope is that they can eventually turn it over fully to the police department.The Naloxone Approach in SchoolsAs the opioid crisis hits America hard, states have taken a new approach to keeping students safe: putting naloxone in schools, training counselors on how to approach the opioid crisis, and taking a students first approach to education and understanding of the problem.“We need to get [naloxone] out there, it needs to be available in places," Jon DeLena DEA Associate Special Agent in Charge for New England told ABC News. "The amount of lives it has saved is staggering.”Maryland Rhode Island have passed laws requiring schools to carry naloxone.“Given the scope of the opioid epidemic in our area right now, it’s not outside the realm of possibility that any high school or middle school could have a student on campus who experiences an overdose," said Rhode Island state Sen. Gayle Goldin in a news release. "Every second matters."Other states like Ohio and New Hampshire leave it up to the individual districts to decide whether to put naloxone in schools or not.Dublin City Schools in Dublin, Ohio, with 17,000 students and 20 buildings, has had naloxone in all of its schools since 2016 in order to be "proactive and prepared."The thought is to have school nurses be able to administer the antidote similarly to an EpiPen. It is something the National Association of School Nurses support."There's no downside to having it," Tracey Miller, the deputy superintendent of Dublin City Schools, told ABC News. "Only an upside."DeLena said having naloxone in schools, at first, he was taken aback by it, but realized it was forward thinking."It isn't so much they are worried about a student overdosing, they're worried about someone else on campus overdosing. Whether that's God forbid a teacher, parent at parent pickup or at a game. It could be anybody," he said. "We know this thing is so wide spread, the more I though about it, it's forward leaning and the schools are trying to get ahead of it."An early start – focusing on youth.In New Hampshire, a state some consider ground zero for the opioid crisis, the Drug Enforcement Agency and commu
    Read more...
  • WLS-TV(CHICAGO) -- The Chicago Fire Department is investigating why paramedics mistakenly thought a teenager who was shot in the head was dead and left his body lying in the street covered in a sheet until bystanders saw his arms and legs twitching.Paramedics left Erin Carey, 17, unattended next to a gutter as they treated other victims in the shooting early Monday in the University Village area of Chicago. Once the paramedics were told the teenager was still breathing, they began cardiopulmonary resuscitation and rushed him to a local hospital, officials said.He died at 1:19 a.m. Tuesday, about 20 hours after he was shot twice in the head, officials said."I do understand that paramedics looked at him, believed him to be deceased, covered him with that sheet and moved on to another individual who was nearby who was also shot. They saw motion, movement underneath the sheet. Officers who were present notified paramedics, this man is still alive," Chicago Police First Deputy Anthony Riccio said at a press conference.Officials did not release the names of the paramedics or say how many were at the scene.It was not immediately clear how long Carey was lying in the street before paramedics realized he was still alive. The Chicago Tribune reported he was in the street under a sheet for an hour before bystanders saw his arms and legs, which were exposed, twitching.Chicago Fire Commissioner Jose Santiago said his department is investigating how it came to be that paramedics initially thought Carey was dead."We're trying to piece everything together," Santiago told ABC station WLS-TV. "We're looking at the computers where they put down all that information. Paramedics put down that information."Carey's family members are expected to hold a news conference on Wednesday.The teen was at a party in the University Village neighborhood when two cars began to circle him and other revelers and numerous shots rang out about 4:50 a.m. Monday, according to officials.Carey was one of six people shot. One other victim, a 22-year-old woman, was also killed in the shooting and four men were injured, police said.Carey recently graduated from Evanston Township High in Evanston, Illinois, where he played on the football team. He also played for the Chicago Jokers in a youth football league, said Eric McClendon, who coaches the team."I'm heartbroken because this is a player that I personally knew. A player that I had to pick up and bring to practice," McClendon told WLS-TV.
    Read more...
  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Summer is upon us, which means it's time to hit your local farmers market for the freshest seasonal ingredients.seasonal food not only tastes amazing, but it helps build a sustainable food system, supports local farmers and enhances recipes because you're using layers of flavors have been picked at their peak.Summer is synonymous with an abundance of fresh veggies that are perfect to toss on a hot grill or swap some peaches for something sweet.New York City-based pastry chef Jessica Weiss of Marta, Maialino and Caffe Marchio finds much of her inspiration for desserts, pastries and bread from the produce offered at the Union Square Greenmarket.GrowNYC, the educational and environmental program behind the Greenmarket, said their network of farmers ensures access to the freshest, healthiest local food and "just-picked" produce."The advantages of eating seasonal and locally sourced produce are huge," a spokesperson for GrowNYC told ABC News. "First off, your food is grown close to where you live, so it doesn’t have to travel long distances to get to your table or picnic basket. It’s fresh and delicious, and not distressed from a cross-country trip. This lack of travel - and related greenhouse gas emissions -- is immensely important to environmental sustainability.""Another perk of eating local food is that it helps keep regional farmers on their land so that land doesn’t end up being sold for development. It’s a win-win," they said.Here's a full list of what's in season during the peak summer months:Arugula (June, July, August)Asparagus (June)Beets, beet greens (June, July, August)Blueberries (July, August)Broccoli (June, July, August)Cabbage (June, July, August)Carrots (August)Chard (June, July, August)Cherries (June, July)Chili peppers (June, July, August)Chives (June, July, August)Currants (June, July, August)Garlic, garlic scapes (June, July)Green onions (June, July, August)Herbs (basil, cilantro, mint, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, sorrel)Kohlrabi (June, July)Lettuce (June, July, August)Melons (July, August)Mesclun (June, July, August)Peas (July, August)Radishes (June, July, August)Rhubarb (June, July)Scallions (June, July, August)Spinach (June, July, August)Strawberries (June, July)Summer squash (June, July, August)Tomatoes (July, August)Turnip greens (June, July, August)Watercress (June, July)Zucchini (June, July, August)Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Stress may not just affect the mind, but may actually affect the physical immune system, a new study found.Everyone will experience a significant life stressor at some point in their lives, such as loss of a loved one, or exposure to violence. While most people exposed to hardships gradually recover, a significant percentage develop severe psychiatric reactions like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), acute stress reactions or adjustment disorder.But the study, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association asked: Do psychiatric reactions to life stressors result in the physical dysfunction of the immune system?Autoimmune disorders like celiac disease, Crohn’s disease, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis are conditions where the immune system mistakenly attacks the body, incorrectly sensing foreign invaders. The causes of autoimmune diseases are largely unknown, but genetic, infectious and environmental factors are thought to play a role. These immune diseases strike even the young, who haven’t experienced the stressors noted in this study.To assess whether there was a connection between stressors and these autoimmune disorders, researchers from the University of Iceland looked at the medical records of 100,000 people with stress-related psychiatric disorders between 1981 and 2013 in Sweden and compared them to 120,000 of their siblings and nearly 1.1 million unrelated people who had no stress-related disorders. People with a stress-related psychiatric disorder in the study were, on average, diagnosed at age 41 and 40 percent were male.Compared to those without stress-related disorders, they were at an increased risk of 41 different autoimmune diseases -- and patients with PTSD were at an increased risk of having multiple autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Crohn’s disease and celiac disease.The risk for all autoimmune diseases may not be equal: This study found a higher risk for celiac disease and lower for rheumatoid arthritis.For patients with PTSD, taking antidepressant medications that block serotonin (SSRIs) was associated with a decreased risk of autoimmune disease, which "strengthens the evidence for the potential causal link between stress-related disorder and subsequent autoimmune diseases," lead author Dr. Huan Song told ABC News.Previous studies have also shown a link between Vietnam War veterans with PTSD and a higher occurrence of autoimmune diseases. But more research is needed to understand why.“We need more studies to inform the potential underlying mechanism behind the association," Song said, "for example exploring potential genetic and early environmental contributors and the effect of alternations in health-related behavior."Overall, this study's findings suggest that stress can impair the body’s immune system, according to the researchers, and further research and in more places could help.One explanation could be that a major life stressor can cause severe lifestyle changes like less sleep, more smoking and alcohol or substance abuse, less exercise and worse diet. In turn, those may contribute to the development of autoimmune disease.This study was limited in a few ways. Autoimmune diseases may be underrepresented, because less severe autoimmune conditions managed by primary care doctors were not included in this study. This study was also done in Sweden and may not be applicable to other populations. In addition, it is a study of what researchers observed and they may not have known some of the natural differences that could explain the study findings.The findings show an association between stressors and the immune system, but not that the psychiatric stressors caused the immune problems."The under-diagnosis and under-treatment of these studied stress-related disorders have been an issue discussed for many years," Song said. "Based on our results, patients suffering from severe emotional reacti
    Read more...
  • Nichole Brooks(DALLAS) -- A mom who made the decision to shave her toddler's head as he undergoes chemotherapy for cancer treatment shared her powerful photos to Facebook.And though it was a difficult process, Nichole Brooks took great comfort in what happened when her 2.5-year-old son Wyatt looked in the mirror and saw himself hairless for the first time.Wyatt, who communicates primarily though sign language, signed the word, "Beautiful.""We knew from the beginning we would shave Wyatt's hair before chemo took it away," Brooks told "Good Morning America." The doctors told us hair loss usually begins by week two. On day six of treatment I found small amounts of hair on his pillow. I knew it was time."On June 2, the Brooks family -- Nichole, her husband Colin, their two daughters and Wyatt were at the beach. When they arrived home that day, Brooks said she "noticed Wyatt had a full-body rash, random and unexplainable bruises and his eyes were very bloodshot."After a series of tests in the emergency room that day, leukemia was the diagnosis. Wyatt is now being treated at Children's Medical Center in Dallas.It was last week that Wyatt had his haircut. Brooks arranged for a nurse to do the cut in his room."Wyatt sat on my lap and we were in a sheet to catch the hair as it fell," she said. "He has never liked haircuts and this was no exception. I cuddled and kissed his cheeks. We both cried but as soon as the clippers were turned off he looked up at me and smiled."It was then that Wyatt looked in the mirror and told his mother he was "beautiful." It's a word, his mom said, that he often uses to describe himself and others.Daily lab tests show the chemo is "doing it's job," Brooks said. But as a result, the toddler has lost his ability to walk and stand because of pain and muscle weakness.Still, his mom called the prognosis "promising." Children with Down syndrome, which Wyatt has, tend to respond very well to chemotherapy, his mom said."Looking too far ahead is overwhelming and scary so we choose to soak up every hug, every kiss and every cuddle while supporting him through each test, medication and therapy."The decision to shave Wyatt's head gave the family power in a situation where there is very little."For us, shaving his head meant we had control over something that would inevitably happen on its own. We decided cancer would not take his hair away, instead we would shave it as an act of courage and bravery. The baldness is now part of his armor. He is a warrior ready for battle."Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...