• iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- If you need another reason to avoid parties, consider this finding from the U.K. show Food Unwrapped: you can get a nasty stomach bug, and even herpes, from party dip.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- With the shocking deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain still fresh in our minds and dramatic new statistics showing suicides on the rise, we’re all grappling with how pervasive and devastating suicide is.Around 1.4 million in the United States alone are estimated to attempt suicide every year. Someone in your life could be struggling right now and you may not even realize it, experts say.Behind the statistics of suicide are real people, survivors, who struggled in their darkest days and was able to break through, emerging with a story of resiliency and hope.“They’ve been there and they’ve made it out alive,” said Stacey Freedenthal, a psychotherapist and educator in Denver who is a suicide attempt survivor.“They are people who were on the edge of death and then go on and continue living,” she said. “I find that very hopeful.”Anyone in crisis, or who knows someone in crisis, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting TALK to 741-741.Here are four people from across the country who shared with "Good Morning America" their personal journeys to shed light on the darkness.At a career high, woman who seemingly had it all thought about suicide 'constantly'Kelechi Ubozoh, 32-year-old from Oakland, CaliforniaWhen we lose people who seemingly have everything, it can be very scary. I know first-hand that appearances can be deceiving.Right before my suicide attempt, I looked like I had it all. A job in my field, a good relationship, and the first undergraduate published in The New York Times. I also thought about killing myself constantly.Why didn’t I reach out to anyone? Well, the truth is that I had. I quietly tried to share that I was struggling, but instead of help, I was told that I was selfish, being dramatic, and needed to pray. None of these messages was helpful. I felt like a burden and learned to hide my pain and pretend. After a sexual assault, the years of stuffing down my feelings eventually erupted into a suicide attempt.Healing looks different for everyone, but for me it was connecting with the feelings I had avoided, developing boundaries, trauma-informed therapy, mental health advocacy, and removing toxic people from my life. I’ve built a safety net of family and friends to catch me when I fall.When someone is physically sick, we know exactly what to do. We bring casseroles, send flowers and cards, and think about what someone who is in pain needs. I don’t think it should be any different for folks who are feeling suicidal. Personally, I need connection and to interrupt the isolation and negative thoughts in my head.So, please be good to each other. Check on your strong friends who have it together, and your friends who are “too busy” and disappeared. If we can create a world where the stigma of suicide is decreased so people speak out when they are in pain, maybe we can prevent anyone else from dying.12 years later, suicidal thoughts remain but response is differentDese'Rae L. Stage, 35-year-old from PhiladelphiaI lost a friend to suicide for the first time when I was 15. I was already having suicidal thoughts, but losing Bryan took my abstract suffering and made suicide suddenly very real to me.Over the next few years, I continued to struggle with those thoughts, and with self-injury, both anchored down by a deep depression. I questioned my sexuality and I was outed against my will.I went away to college and failed my first semester. That was the first time anyone suggested that I might need to see a doctor. Prior to that, what I was feeling was labeled “teenage angst,” and I was told to get over it. This began a years-long journey with therapists, psychiatrists, and medications —- none of which worked -- and I had a hard time staying the course.When I was 23, at the end of an emotionally and physically abus
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  • ABC News(CLARKE COUNTY, VA.) -- Scientists and officials on the East Coast are working to locate invasive plants known as giant hogweed that can cause third-degree burns and even permanent blindness to those who come in contact, after Virginia residents reported discovering the noxious plants in their yards.Giant hogweed looks very similar to the common native species cow parsnip, but if the hogweed's sap touches the skin it can cause chronic, burning pain that can last several weeks, according to experts at Virginia Tech University's Massey Herbarium.“Once you get the sap on your skin, and you are exposed to the sunlight, the chemical is activated [and] it can cause a severe burn,” Massey Herbarium curator Jordan Metzgar told ABC News.
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  • BY DR. KARINE TAWAGI, BY ABC NEWS
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Summer is all about backyard barbecues and that means lots of burgers and food on the grill.If you're trying to be healthier this summer, there are simple swaps to lighten up the go-to grilling dishes, says nutrition expert Brooke Alpert.Alpert, author of "The Diet Detox," shared a healthy summer BBQ menu with leaner proteins that are lower in calories and sodium content to keep you on track.1. Try a turkey burger instead of beef and skip the bun.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW  YORK) -- Weight loss may be a promising treatment for obese people with one of the most common joint disorders, according to a new study.For those who are overweight or obese with knee osteoarthritis, losing 20 percent of their body weight can result in a 25 percent reduction in pain, according to a study published Monday in the medical journal Arthritis Care and Research.Researchers at Wake Forest University analyzed data from a previous trial that included 240 overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis and pain. Each lost weight over an 18-month period. Some had lost less than 5 percent of their body weight, some between 5 and 10 percent of their body weight, a smaller group shed between 10 and 20 percent of their body weight, and 20 percent or more of their body weight.Everyone who lost weight improved in the areas of overall pain, quality of life, mobility, knee joint loads and inflammation. Researchers also found that the greater the weight loss, the greater chance of improvements in those areas.More benefits were seen in the group that lost at least 10 percent of their body weight, and the best benefits were seen in the group that lost more than 20 percent of their body weight.“Currently, there is no treatment that slows the progression or prevents this debilitating disease; hence, research has focused on improving clinical outcomes important to the patient,” Dr. Stephen Messier of Wake Forest University and lead author of the study said in a statement.“A 10 percent weight loss is the established target recommended by the National Institutes of Health as an initial weight loss for overweight and obese adults. The importance of our study is that a weight loss of 20 percent or greater—double the previous standard—results in better clinical outcomes, and is achievable without surgical or pharmacologic intervention,” Messier added.While the study was small, it showed that those who lost 20 percent of their body weight had an additional 25 percent reduction in pain and significantly higher quality of life compared to the group that lost 10 percent of their body weight.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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