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  • KMGH-TV(DENVER) -- The FBI agent who accidentally shot a nightclub-goer when he did a backflip on a dance floor in Denver turned himself in Tuesday to face charges in connection with the incident, according to the district attorney's office and jail records.The agent, 29-year-old Chase Bishop, who is stationed in Washington, D.C., surrendered on a warrant in connection with the June 2 incident at the Mile High Spirits Tasting Room near downtown Denver, officials said.Denver Police tell ABC News that Bishop is being investigated for second degree assault, pending a decision on formal charges from the Denver district attorney.The shooting left Thomas Reddington, 24, with a bullet wound to his left leg.Cellphone video of the incident that has since gone viral on social media shows Bishop dancing on a dance floor in the crowded bar when he suddenly did a backflip. Bishop fell forward, his gun slipped out of his waistband and landed on the dance floor.The FBI declined comment.
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  • WLS-TV(CHICAGO) -- One suspect is dead and another is in custody after a federal agent with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives was shot multiple times when he and other agents were ambushed during an undercover operation, officials tell ABC News.The agent was part of the ATF's ongoing effort to help local authorities go after the "worst of the worst" in the Chicago area, officials told ABC News. Federal agents are trying to help bring the violent crime in Chicago under control, officials said.The ambush occurred in Gary, Indiana on Thursday, agency officials said. The city is about a 45-minute drive from Chicago.The agent, whose name was not released, was hospitalized in critical but stable condition, an ATF official told reporters.Two senior law enforcement officials briefed on the incident told ABC News that the agent was shot twice, in the arm and in the chest, but that his condition was currently considered non-life-threatening.Agency officials said that the ATF Chicago Field Division responded to the scene in Gary, which is about 30 miles southeast of Chicago."ATF Agents are working with us every hour of every day to reduce gun violence in Chicago and it's beyond a partnership, it's one team, one fight," the police department tweeted.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(EL PASO, Texas) -- Leslie Silva had yet to reach her teens when her father, Milo Silva, was deported for the third time.Since that deportation in 2012, Leslie, who now lives with her mother, two older sisters and two nieces in El Paso, Texas, has tried to spend every weekend with Milo, who lives in Ciudad Juarez in Mexico.“When I was little I didn’t know what was going on and why he was gone for such a long time,” Leslie Silva told ABC News. “But now that I understand, it’s just heartbreaking not having him here especially that we are at an age when a lot of things are happening.”The 18-year-old recently posted a video of her meeting her father after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border that quickly went viral with nearly 4 million views in less than a week.Shot by her sister, Ingrid Silva, the video shows the Eastlake High School graduate dressed in a purple graduation cap and gown, crossing the Yselta-Zaragoza Bridge to give her father “the honor of seeing her first” before she took part in the school's June 3 graduation ceremony."[Earlier] he was calm about it … The day of, at the moment he saw me, I saw his face light up and he started crying and I started crying," she recalled fondly. "But they were all happy tears."Even though he celebrated with the family over the phone, Milo has missed key family events including the wedding of his oldest daughter and the birth of his grandchildren.“It’s really heartbreaking not having him here with us. Who wouldn’t want their dad with us?” she said.At the beginning, when Milo, who currently works as a security guard at a factory, was struggling with getting small jobs, the family was often interrogated while crossing the border. Silva said that eventually border patrol stopped asking questions when they realized that the girls were going to meet their father.“We try to spend as much time as we can together when we go and do small things that we can as a family like go to the movies or go [out] eat or just be at the house,” she said. “But once we leave, it’s kind of sad, leaving him behind.”She added that the family isn’t nervous about their situation given the political climate.“We are used to [it],” she said nonchalantly. “The worst has already happened.”Leslie, who in the fall will attend UTEP in El Paso to study nursing, said she was often quizzed by her friends about her father’s absence growing up.“They didn’t really know [because] I wouldn’t tell anyone. I would just say, 'Oh I am going to Ciudad Juarez' and they would be like, 'Oh, okay.' They would ask me [where my dad is] and I would say he is not here. My parents are still together … But they wouldn’t really understand [because] I wouldn’t talk about it too much,” she explained.Leslie said that at first, most of the comments on her video on Instagram were negative.“They were just saying it was weird that my dad was deported three times, like how could that happen? Or they would focus on the smallest things in the video like the plastic bag he was holding,” she said. “My family agreed that we won’t let it affect us. People don’t really the story behind it and why we did things the way we did.”Laughing about her celebrity status, she said that she hopes to spread the awareness about the situation of families like hers.“There’s always a story behind someone they won’t know about and they don’t know what they go through. It’s not easy,” she said. “I got a lot of that in the comments they said, 'Oh, why doesn’t he get his citizenship?' [Because] it’s not easy.”
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  • Released by US Attorneys Office, Middle District of Florida(ORLANDO, Fla.) -- A city police officer acting as a security guard didn't do his job and more than two dozen of his colleagues failed in their duties or violated the civil rights of surviving victims after the 2016 Orlando, Florida, nightclub massacre, according to a new federal lawsuit.The gunman, Omar Mateen, was shot dead by police after killing 49 people and wounding 58 at Pulse nightclub in what was then the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.Orlando police officer Adam Gruler, according to court papers filed Thursday in U.S. District Court, "was at Pulse at all pertinent times and was charged with providing security to Pulse. Instead, he abandoned his post, thereby allowing [the] shooter to not only enter the club once to scout out the area and make sure nobody could stop him, but to then leave Pulse, retrieve his firearms, and return to execute his sinister plan to kill people."The lawsuit also lists 30 unidentified Orlando police officers who the plaintiffs allege either remained outside the nightclub while the shooting occurred or held witnesses against their will after they fled the massacre. The city of Orlando is listed as an additional defendant."While people, unarmed, innocent were inside a club getting absolutely massacred by a crazed gunman there were a bunch of people ... with guns, with the training and capability to take that shooter out,” Solomon Radner, attorney for the plaintiffs in the case, told ABC News.“Instead of doing their job, they worried about themselves, they stayed outside, they worried only about their own safety, knowing that people were literally getting mowed down by the dozens just a few feet away.”In a joint statement, the city of Orlando and the Orlando Police Department said they have not seen the lawsuit, “nor have we been formally served with the lawsuit. We can't comment on the substance of the litigation.”“Nearly two years after the horrific act of hate inside the Pulse nightclub, our community continues to mourn the 49 lives taken and provide support for all those impacted. On the morning of June 12, 2016, federal, state and local law enforcement officers and first responders put themselves in harm’s way to save as many lives as possible,” according to the statement.“Our first responders are committed to the safety of this community, and they stand ready to protect and serve.”The police union did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment.Gruler declined to comment Thursday, referring ABC News to the city and police department.Mateen, a U.S. born citizen who had pledged his allegiance to the Islamic State terrorist organization in a 911 called he made from the nightclub, attacked the club June 12, 2016.The police investigation showed that Mateen began the massacre around 2 a.m., but it wasn't until around 5 a.m. that Orlando police officers shot him to death after they used an armored truck to breach a wall.Among the 34 plaintiffs in the lawsuit are the estates of six people who were killed in the shooting. Nine of the plaintiffs were detained or "arrested" by police as they ran out of the nightclub, Radner said."As the people were running out of the club, thinking that they were safe, the police were there waiting for them, and the police, essentially, for all intents and purposes, arrested every single victim there and held them for 10 to 12 hours," he added."Virtually every victim they could get their hands on who wasn't shot or dead, they basically arrested them. They were not free to leave, they were not free to call their loved ones, they were not even free to go to the bathroom or to get water."The officers violated the Fourth Amendment right against unreasonable searches and seizures by detaining and holding the victims and witnesses against their will and confiscating the cellphones and vehicles of some of them, Radner sai
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(LAS VEGAS) -- Las Vegas authorities have released dozens of 911 calls from the Oct. 1 shooting, shedding light on the panic and chaos that ensued at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival as bullets rained down from an unknown gunman 32 stories in the sky above.In one call between a 911 dispatcher and the fire department, the dispatcher says that there are "possibly 20 subjects down" and that numerous calls were coming in reporting an active shooter.The dispatcher then says that 33 calls are on hold, and they are getting calls of a man who had been shot with a pellet gun at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino.In a later call, Mandalay Bay's security dispatch says there's an active shooter in Room 32135, adding that the shooter is inside the room and managers are on the rooms below and above it."Pretty much, they can just hear what sounds like semi-automatic rapid fire, and we have an officer that has been hit," the dispatcher says.In one call from the scene below, gunshots could be heard in the background as a woman beckons for help to be sent to the Las Vegas strip right across the street from Mandalay Bay. When the dispatcher asks how many people, the caller responds, "thousands." The woman said that she and others were "on top of the House of Blues" and "trying to stay down."Another call detailed that people had been shot and "everyone's running to get out of here" as terrified concert-goers yell in the background.One caller detailed that 100 shots had been fired, likening the sounds to a machine gun. Another concert-goer said that about 100 people were continuing to hide in a "beverage container," although shots hadn't been heard in about two minutes.Some callers detailed the conditions of the wounded near them. One woman had been shot in the head, and another detailed another victim that was "bleeding out." One caller told dispatchers that he had been shot in the leg and was hiding in a business that he busted open a window to get into.One caller, who said he gave his shirt up to use as a tourniquet, said there were 20 people around him, describing the scene as "pretty bad."Authorities also released video taken from a rooftop that shows people tending to victims below.Fifty-eight people were killed and hundreds more injured when gunman Stephen Paddock opened fire from his suite on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino.
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