Archives
  • Antwon Rose/Facebook(PITTSBURGH) -- The family of an unarmed teenager shot and killed by police while he was fleeing a traffic stop doesn't "want him to have died in vain," a family attorney said.Antwon Rose, 17, who was African-American, was shot dead by an East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, police officer Tuesday after the teen and two others were pulled over in a car believed to have been connected to an earlier shooting that night.The deadly shooting was caught on cellphone video, which is being reviewed by authorities.Rose's family is "devastated" and "stunned," family attorney Fred Rabner told ABC News Thursday morning.Rabner described Rose as a "beautiful" and "kind" teenager who worked with young children at a gymnastics gym as well as at a local Domino's Pizza."This is not someone who was in trouble ever," Rabner said. "This is not a family that was anything but doting and loving about their son.""It doesn't seem to me that there is any justification ever for shooting an individual who is fleeing in the back," Rabner said, adding that the officer was standing "poised" and appeared to shoot from 15 to 30 feet away.Demonstrators took over local streets during a downpour Wednesday, holding "Black Lives Matter" signs, blocking traffic and confronting officers.At the peaceful protest was Rose's cousin Theresa Lynn Rose Monroe, who said the family is distraught and demanding answers."It's senseless," she told ABC News. "He wasn't a threat. And I just don't understand why -- why does it got to keep happening?"The deadly incident began with a separate shooting about 15 minutes earlier, when someone in a passing car shot and wounded a 22-year-old man. The victim also returned fire at the passing car, police said."Witnesses described the vehicle involved in the shooting, and the description was broadcast" to officers, police said.An East Pittsburgh police officer spotted a car matching the description -- a silver Chevy Cruze -- and pulled the car over at 8:40 p.m., police said. The driver was ordered out of the car and directed to the ground, but Rose and another individual in that car fled on foot, police said.The officer shot three times at Rose as he fled -- and struck him three times, police said.The other passenger, who has not been identified, remains at large, police said.The officer had been sworn in with the department hours before the shooting, ABC station WTAE-TV reported. He has been placed on administrative leave, police said.Police said Rose did not have a weapon on him, and none of the three suspects fired at officers, adding that "two firearms were later recovered from the suspect vehicle."The driver was detained and later released, police said."We are committed to finding the truth in this investigation," Coleman McDonough, superintendent of Allegheny County Police Department, told ABC News on Wednesday.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Thursday marks the first day of summer and the longest day of the year across much of the Northern Hemisphere.New York City will experience 15 hours and 6 minutes of daylight, while Los Angeles will see 14 hours and 26 minutes of daylight. In Fairbanks, Alaska, residents will experience a whopping 21 hours and 48 minutes of daylight.But the first day of summer has also brought some extreme weather across the country.
    Read more...
  • U.S. Geological Survey(HONOLULU) -- Lava from the Kilauea volcano eruption on the Big Island in Hawaii makes for very photogenic selfies and social media posts, but authorities are cracking down on thrill-seekers who are getting too close for comfort.Since the volcano first erupted on May 3, bubbling lava, molten rock and fissures have forced thousands of residents to evacuate the area. Some visitors, however, have posted selfies standing mere feet away from rivers of lava.Seattle resident Ruth Groza posted a photo on Instagram early Thursday morning and said in the caption that she and a friend went to the location, thanks to a local resident. "We were the first people he took out here and some of the first people on earth to stand next to this flow," she wrote.Groza told ABC News she was traveling with her friend Braden Lood, who also posted a selfie on Instagram.Government officials in Hawaii have arrested or cited at least a dozen people in the past 10 days.Officials told ABC News they are increasing fines to $5,000 and adding up to a year behind bars if someone is caught taking photos.Hawaii police have also set up roadblocks to prevent nonresidents from entering nearby neighborhoods to take photos.The Kilauea volcano eruption shows no signs of abating, and new video shows a raging river of lava spewing from an open fissure. The fast-moving lava has reportedly flowed at a rate of 15 mph in some places.More than 500 homes have been destroyed or damaged from the hot lava as the National Guard continues its efforts to assess the damage.The U.S. Geological Survey said the lava flow continues with "little change."Access for news crews has become even more limited since the first eruption, and ABC News correspondents were required to wear special masks as officials monitored air quality on-site. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • iStock/Thinkstock(CHICAGO) -- After the University of Chicago announced late last week it's scrapping a requirement for applicants to submit SAT or ACT test scores, some experts predict other colleges may soon do the same."I know other schools will follow," Bob Schaeffer, public education director at the nonprofit National Center for Fair and Open Testing, told Good Morning America. "It's a huge trend.""Evidence shows that there are better ways to determine which applicants are likely to succeed as undergraduates," Schaeffer said. "You don't need the ACT or SAT test to do that. High school record predicts undergraduate success and graduation better than any test has ever done."The University of Chicago's vice president and dean of admissions, James G. Nondorf, touted the new test-optional application process as a way for the school to become more accessible for "under-resourced and underrepresented students."The school's revamped admissions process and new financial aid initiative "levels the playing field, allowing first-generation and low-income students to use technology and other resources to present themselves as well as any other college applicant," Nondorf said in a statement. "We want students to understand the application does not define you -- you define the application."Schaeffer argued that "non-academic" factors such as extracurricular activities, leadership skills, community service and "whether you've overcome obstacles in your life," are also often key indicators of whether a student will thrive at a university."Most of that is ignored when filling out bubbles on a Saturday morning, which is all those tests are," he said.As the standardized test-prep tutoring industry has also grown into a multimillion-dollar industry, many question how equitable the tests are for low-income students who can't afford the extra coaching.The College Board, the organization that publishes and develops the SAT, told ABC News that it's continuing to "help students clear a path to college across a changing college admission landscape.""With our members," the organization said in a statement, "we redesigned the SAT to make it a more fair test for all students, and we revolutionized test prep with free, personalized practice. We will always bet on students and firmly believe that all students can practice, improve and show they're ready for college."A report published this year by the National Association for College Admission Counseling, a trade group of more than 16,000 college counselors and admissions professionals, looked at 28 schools that have adopted a test-optional policy. Researchers found a majority of the institutions reported an increase in overall applications as well as an increase in applications from students with more diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in college populations.Schools that go test-optional "can choose from a better pool that better reflects where the United States is," Schaeffer said. Moreover, "it creates pathways for college degrees for many kids that would have been shut out."Going test-optional also does not necessarily hurt those who performed well on standardized tests, according to Schaeffer, but rather gives students the choice to submit their scores only if they feel it helps their application."A kid who has very high SAT and ACT scores and a weak academic record can still apply with those test scores," he said.A test-optional application simply "allows teenagers to put their best foot forward," Schaeffer said. "If it's test scores, so be it. But if it's not test scores, it's not a barrier for them."The ACT told ABC News in a statement that it "respects the right of each institution to establish the admission policies that best meet the needs of the college and its students," but urged institutions considering going test-optional to "determine whether or not students and the institution will benefit from such a move.""We believe -- and research suggests -- that
    Read more...
  • Drew Angerer/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Amid the Trump administration's crackdown on illegal immigration, thousands of children were separated from their families, while parents were prosecuted under a "zero-tolerance" policy.On Wednesday afternoon, Donald Trump signed an executive order that he said would keep immigrant families at the border together "while ensuring we have a powerful, very strong border."From May -- when the policy was enacted -- through June 9, almost 2,300 children have been separated from their parents, according to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Those children have been placed in the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement under the Department of Health and Human Services, which manages care for unaccompanied minors.Despite the new executive order, it's unclear when or how those children will be returned to their parents.'Still very early'"It is still very early, and we are awaiting further guidance on the matter," Brian Marriott, a spokesman at the Administration for Children and Families, a division of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), said in a statement late Wednesday. He added that the department's focus is on "continuing to provide quality services and care to the minors" in the facilities and "reunifying minors with a relative or appropriate sponsor."Under the current process, HHS works "expeditiously" to place children in care of a sponsor, although there is no time limit in "terms of days," said Steve Wagner, an acting assistant secretary at HHS.The president faced mounting pressure from advocacy groups, lawmakers, foreign governments and even family members to end the policy separating families at the border. Images of the children shown to him by his daughter, Ivanka, are said to have helped sway him.Advocates slammed Trump's executive order, saying it ended the separation of families only to require that DHS jail children along with their parents while criminal prosecutions proceeded.'It was barbaric'"We're not fooled by this bait and switch," said Archi Pyati, chief of policy at Tahirih Justice Center. "It was barbaric to separate children from their parents. Family detention is also inhumane and harmful to children. Prison is no place for kids."As of earlier this week, there were 11,786 children in HHS custody -- both children separated from their parents and unaccompanied minors who illegally crossed the border alone.In recent weeks, HHS opened facilities containing temporary, tent-like structures in Florida and Texas to deal with the influx of children."They are under constant supervision and observation to address any health or medical concerns while they are in our care," Wagner said.57 daysThe average stay in custody for an unaccompanied minor is 57 days.There is no official policy for keeping parents in Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody informed of where their children are -- other than a 2017 directive that provides guidance regarding undocumented parents "who have a direct interest in family court or child welfare proceedings in the United States."Once a parent is prosecuted and the child is placed in HHS custody, ICE "will make every effort to reunite the child with the parent once the parent’s immigration case has been adjudicated," a spokesperson for ICE said before the executive order was signed."ICE is committed to connecting family members as quickly as possible after separation so that parents know the location of their children," the spokesperson added.The executive order does not overturn the administration's "zero-tolerance" policy, as Trump said during the Oval Office signing, but rather allows the Department of Homeland Security to maintain custody of undocumented families pending immigration proceedings.The order also said DHS can construct new housing facilities. There are currently three family detention facilities -- one in Pennsylvania and two in Texas. As of June 4, the total population of the facilities wa
    Read more...