Archives
  • Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain criticized President Donald Trump Thursday for halting U.S.-South Korea military exercises, calling it a "mistake" and warning national U.S. security could be undermined."Making unnecessary and unreciprocated concessions is not in our interests — and it is a bad negotiating tactic," McCain said in a statement.When he announced Tuesday that "we will be stopping the war games," Trump said he thinks the exercises are "very provocative," similar to language North Korea uses to denounce the joint military exercises."Parroting Chinese and North Korean propaganda by saying joint exercises are ‘provocative’ undermines our security and alliances," McCain said in his statement. While wishing Trump well in his negotiations with North Korea, McCain advised taking a skeptical approach toward the regime.“I continue to hope that President Trump will be successful in his diplomatic efforts to achieve the complete, verifiable, and irreversible denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula," he said. "But we must not impose upon ourselves the burden of providing so-called ‘good faith’ concessions as the price for continued dialogue."Both Trump and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo have said suspending the exercises is conditional upon North Korea moving toward nuclear disarmament."We will be stopping the war games ... unless and until we see the future negotiation is not going along like it should," Trump said after his meeting with Kim Jong Un Tuesday in Singapore.  McCain had broader conditions, saying until North Korea takes concrete steps to address its weapons programs and human rights violations, "no concessions should be made, and the sanctions must continue.”Pompeo made similar remarks himself the day before McCain released his statement, taking a jab at previous administrations. At a press conference alongside foreign ministers Kang Kyung-wha of South Korea and Taro Kono of Japan Wednesday, he vowed not to repeat "the mistakes of the past.""They were providing economic and financial relief before the complete denuclearization had taken place," Pompeo said. "That is not going to happen.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • Alex Edelman/Getty Images(ALEXANDRIA, Va.) -- One year to the day since Rep. Steve Scalise was seriously wounded in a shooting during a team practice in Alexandria, Va., the Louisiana Republican took to Washington's Nationals Park for the 2018 Congressional Baseball Game, making a play at the very start of the game.Scalise, who endured multiplies surgeries and needed to walk with crutches for months, made the start for the GOP at second base, snagged a grounder on the first pitch of the game and promptly threw out Rep. Raul Ruiz, a California Democrat, at first, before being mobbed by his teammates. The moment came just minutes after Scalise was escorted to second by U.S. Capitol Police officers David Bailey and Crystal Griner — the officers who were injured responding to the shooting last year.Scalise would remain in the game for one more batter before being replaced at second base to a standing ovation. On June 14, 2017, a lone gunman opened fire as Republican lawmakers were practicing for the annual game. One of four people shot, Scalise suffered life-threatening injuries."I had a long road to recovery to get to this point," Scalise told reporters Thursday morning. "I’ve got more to go, but to think that after nine surgeries ... I get to be back out here with my colleagues ... God bless America!"Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • nikkiballs/Instagram(WASHINGTON) -- Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was nominated by President Bill Clinton to serve as an associate justice on the U.S. Supreme Court exactly 25 years ago on Thursday. She became the first Jewish female and second female justice to serve in the Supreme Court. Ranking top of her class at Cornell University and Harvard Law School, Ginsburg has ruled in a number of significant cases including the closing down of the last all-male university in the country in United States v. Virginia and legalizing same-sex marriage in Obergefell v. Hodges.Here are five things to know about the judge famously referred to as the "Notorious RBG."Significant CasesIn Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Lilly Ledbetter accused the tire manufacturing company of gender discrimination after claiming the company refused to pay her equally to her male counterparts because she was a woman. The Supreme Court voted 5-4 in favor of Goodyear, a decision that prompted a dissenting opinion from Ginsburg.Ginsburg urged Congress to amend Title VII in her dissent. Ledbetter said that the unequal pay she was receiving was in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. At the time, the clause stated that the only days that could be investigated were 180 days prior to her filing the complaint, even if the employer found out about the unequal pay afterwards. Goodyear used this clause to rule in their favor and won the case.In Ginsburg’s dissent, she stated that “discrimination is at work develops over time."Congress listened and the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act -- which says that “unfair pay complaints can be filed within 180 days of a discriminatory paycheck and that 180 days resets after each paycheck is issued” -- became President Barack Obama’s first signed bill when he took office in 2009.“Knowingly carrying past pay discrimination forward must be treated as lawful conduct,” Ginsburg wrote in her dissent.Work outside of the courtBefore Ledbetter brought her case to the Supreme Court, Ginsburg had been a public advocate of women’s rights beginning in 1972 when she founded the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Women’s Rights Project. Through advocacy and outreach, the project has aided women of color, low-income women, and immigrant women who are “subject to gender bias” and face “pervasive barriers to equality." Style iconReferred to as the "Notorious RBG," Ginsburg is also known for her touch of femininity in the court by wearing a variety of jabots, a detailed accessory worn around the neck. On days when the court makes a decision, Ginsburg will wear her jabot of dissent. The collar speaks for itself when she disagrees with the majority opinion. Ginsburg famously wore the jabot of dissent the day after the election of President Donald Trump, no cases were scheduled for that day. Showing support in many waysGinsburg has become a role model to the movement of women’s rights and fans have shown support through the art they place on their skin.One Instagram user even showed off her tattoo of Ginsburg’s jabot. Another fan had a portrait of Ginsburg tattooed on her arm! Named after a new speciesApart from the tattoos, clothing, and fan art, nothing beats the honor of being named after a new species of praying mantis!In a statement from the Cleveland Museum of Natural History in June 2016, scientists are using a new method to identify praying mantis -- this time females.“Male genitalia characters have historically been a standard in classifying insect species,” the statement said. “The research is the first formal study to use female genital structures to delimit a new species of praying mantis.”In honor of Ginsburg for “her relentless fight for gender equality,” scientists are calling the new species of mantis Ilomantis ginsburgae. Scientists also say the neck plate of the insect rep
    Read more...
  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- More than two dozen of the largest religious groups in the U.S. are imploring the Trump administration to change its "zero tolerance" policy that leads to children being separated from parents caught illegally crossing the border.And during an interview with the Christian Broadcasting Network this week, Franklin Graham, a staunch supporter of President Donald Trump, said the practice of separating families was “disgraceful.”The growing list of religious leaders and organizations writing letters and making statements includes several leading evangelical churches and institutions, which often align themselves with Republicans politically."As evangelical Christians guided by the Bible, one of our core convictions is that God has established the family as the fundamental building block of society. The state should separate families only in the rarest of instances,” Russell Moore, President of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and other evangelical leaders wrote in a group letter to the White House.The letter, also signed by the National Association of Evangelicals, Council for Christian Colleges and Universities, National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference and others, went on to call the “traumatic effects” of separation potentially “devastating,” “long-lasting,” and “of utmost concern.” The push-back from faith leaders coincided this week with Attorney General Jeff Sessions Thursday citing the Bible as justification for his new, tough “zero tolerance” immigration policy.“Persons who violate the law of our nation are subject to prosecution. If you violate the law you subject yourself to prosecution," Sessions said, while speaking before church leaders in his home state of Indiana. “I would cite you to the Apostle Paul and his clear and wise command in Romans 13, to obey the laws of the government because God has ordained the government for his purposes.”Asked about the Sessions comments, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders doubled down.“I can say that it's very biblical to enforce the law. It's repeated many times throughout the Bible,” she said, though she added she was aware of Sessions' exact comments.Separating children from parents has come under intense scrutiny from both sides of the aisle and seems to be the result of the Justice Department’s new policy to criminally detain and prosecute 100 percent of people apprehended at the border, even those seeking asylum. The administration has claimed minors cannot be housed with parents in criminal holding facilities, but officials have also said the tough practice might deter people from crossing.The group of evangelical leaders who wrote to the White House addressed on the issue of asylum directly. “Not every individual arriving will merit asylum protection, but we would ask that families be kept together while ensuring each individual asylum seeker is afforded due process according to our laws,” their letter read."We are also concerned that there are fewer legal possibilities for those with a well-founded fear of persecution to be considered for refugee status without needing to make it to the U.S. border,” it went on.During a meeting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Florida this week, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo addressed the Justice Department’s other recent decision to stop accepting asylum claims based on domestic or gang violence.“At its core, asylum is an instrument to preserve the right to life. The Attorney General’s recent decision elicits deep concern because it potentially strips asylum from many women who lack adequate protection. These vulnerable women will now face return to the extreme dangers of domestic violence in their home country,” DiNardo said in a statement and also condemned the continued use of family separatio
    Read more...
  • @HillaryClinton/Twitter(WASHINGTON) -- Buried in the nearly 500-page report released by the Justice Department's inspector general Thursday was a potential bit of irony: Internal investigators discovered that while James Comey was overseeing the FBI's investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of personal email for official business, Comey himself was using personal email for official business.The finding, pointed out on Twitter, drew a snarky admonishment from Clinton herself."But my emails," Clinton posted Thursday on Twitter, echoing the phrase that her supporters have sarcastically used to mock what they see as Republicans' obsession with her use of a private email server while secretary of state. In his report released Thursday, Inspector General Michael Horowitz rebuked Comey for violating longstanding tradition and usurping the attorney general’s authority when he announced in July 2016 that Clinton would not face charges because there was no "clear evidence" that she "intended to violate" the law. But, Comey said, Clinton was "extremely careless" in her "handling of very sensitive, highly classified information,” and the FBI found some classified information on her private email system."None of these e-mails should have been on any kind of unclassified system," Comey said at the time. Meanwhile, Horowitz’s report released Thursday said: "We identified numerous instances in which Comey used a personal email account to conduct unclassified FBI business. We found that, given the absence of exigent circumstances and the frequency with which the use of personal email occurred, Comey's use of a personal email account for unclassified FBI business to be inconsistent with Department policy."In addition to Clinton herself, her top spokesman on the 2016 campaign trail, Brian Fallon, took aim at Comey for the inspector general's finding."Comey did an oped to prebut the IG report. But he neglects to mention or explain the IG’s finding that Comey himself used personal email for official business," Fallon posted to Twitter on Thursday.Nevertheless, the inspector general found that Peter Strzok, the senior FBI agent managing the Clinton email case, also "used his personal email accounts for official government business on several occasions."In one case, Strzok forwarded himself information "that appears to have been under seal at the time," said Horowitz’s report. The matter has now been referred to the FBI to determine whether Strzok violated FBI or Justice Department policies, Horowitz said.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...