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Presented by MidAmerica Financial Resources. You can reach them at 618.548.4777 or greg.malan@lpl.com or on the web at www.mid-america.us

 

Financial Strategies for Young Families

Financial Strategies for Young Families
It’s never too late to start.

Provided by MidAmerica Financial Resources

 

The hardest part is getting started. Even though more than half of U.S. households have some form of investment in the stock market, many new parents may still find that creating a financial strategy is the last thing on their minds. And who can blame them? After all, new parents have a million concerns to keep in mind on top of any unexpected financial pressure that may arise. But for young families with discretionary income, creating a financial strategy may be easier than they realize.1

 

Remember that investing involves risk, and the return and principal value of investments will fluctuate as market conditions change. Investment opportunities should take into consideration your goals, time horizon, and risk tolerance. When sold, investments may be worth more or less than their original cost. Past performance does not guarantee future results.

 

What’s your end goal? What expenses do you anticipate in 5, 10, or even 15 years from now? These can be tough questions to answer while raising a family.

 

Establishing your investments’ goal or goals is one of the many ways your financial professional can help. Before your first meeting, jot down all the financial questions you can think of – no matter how silly they may seem to you. These answers can help define your family’s short-term and long-range financial goals.

 

Once you start, try not to stop. If you have already started investing, congratulations may be in order! In getting an early start, you have taken advantage of a powerful financial asset: time. However, don’t overlook the power of consistency. For some, consistent investing may be the most realistic pathway to pursuing their financial goals.

 

For those who haven’t started, that’s okay too. Remember, it doesn’t always take a lump sum to begin. Even auto-depositing $100 a month into an account is a step toward your family’s goals. And who knows? As your family’s circumstances change, you may be able to contribute even more over time.

 

There is no “one way.” The point is that there isn’t a single, one-size-fits-all solution for young families that are looking to invest in their future. Financial professionals also know this and can help craft a strategy suited to your risk tolerance, goals, and financial situation.

 

MidAmerica Financial Resources may be reached at 618.548.4777 or greg.malan@lpl.com www.mid-america.us

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Adviser, Member FINRA/SIPC.
MidAmerica Financial Resources and Malan Financial Group are separate and unrelated companies to LPL.

Citations.

  1. PewResearch.org, March 25, 2020

Before You Claim Social Security

Before You Claim Social Security

A few things you may want to think about before filing for benefits.

Provided by MidAmerica Financial Resources

 

Determining when to take Social Security benefits is a complicated financial decision. Here are a few things to think about and discuss with your financial professional.

 

How long do you think you will live? If you have a family history that suggests you might live into your 90s, you may want to consider claiming Social Security later. If you start receiving Social Security benefits at or after full retirement age (FRA, which varies from age 66 to 67 for those born in 1943 or later), your monthly benefit will be larger than if you had claimed at 62.1

 

What fits best with your financial strategy – more lifetime payments that are smaller versus fewer lifetime payments that are larger? For the record, Social Security’s actuaries project that the average 65-year-old man will live to 84.0 years, and the average 65-year-old woman, 86.5 years.2

 

Will you keep working? If you want to keep working, you’ll need to be mindful of earning too much income, which may result in your Social Security benefits being taxed.

 

Keep in mind that this article is for informational purposes only. It’s not a replacement for real-life advice, so make certain to consult your tax or accounting professional before modifying your decision on whether to work in retirement.

 

Prior to full retirement age, your benefits may be lessened if your income tops certain limits. In 2020, if you are aged 62 to 65, receive Social Security, and have an income over $18,240, $1 of your benefits will be withheld for every $2. If you receive Social Security and turn 66 later this year, then $1 of your benefits will be withheld for every $3 that you earn above $48,600.3

 

Social Security income may also be taxed above the program’s “combined income” threshold. (“Combined income” = adjusted gross income + nontaxable interest + 50% of Social Security benefits.) Single filers who have combined incomes from $25,000 to $34,000 may have to pay federal income tax on up to 50% of their Social Security benefits, and that also applies to joint filers with combined incomes of $32,000 to $44,000. Single filers with combined incomes above $34,000 and joint filers whose combined incomes surpass $44,000 may have to pay federal income taxes on up to 85% of their Social Security benefits.3

 

When does your spouse want to file? Timing does matter, especially for two-income couples. If the lower-earning spouse collects Social Security benefits first, and then, the higher-earning spouse collects them later, that may result in greater lifetime benefits for the household.4

 

Finally, how much in benefits might be coming your way? Visit SSA.gov to find out, and keep in mind that Social Security calculates your monthly benefit using a formula based on your 35 highest-earning years. If you have worked for less than 35 years, Social Security fills in the “blank years” with zeros. If you have, say, just 33 years of work experience, working another couple years might translate to a slightly higher Social Security income.1

 

When to start drawing Social Security benefits may be one of the most significant financial decisions of your life. Ideally, your choices should be evaluated years in advance – with insight from the financial professional who has helped you prepare for retirement. And if you feel behind on your decision, all the more reason to consider working with a financial professional who may be able to help you up the learning curve.

 

MidAmerica Financial Resources may be reached at 618.548.4777 or greg.malan@lpl.com www.mid-america.us

 

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Adviser, Member FINRA/SIPC.
MidAmerica Financial Resources and Malan Financial Group are separate and unrelated companies to LPL.

Citations.

  1. SSA.gov, 2020
  2. SSA.gov, May 28, 2020
  3. U.S. Social Security Administration, 2020
  4. SSA.gov, February 11, 2020

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