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Presented by MidAmerica Financial Resources. You can reach them at 618.548.4777 or greg.malan@lpl.com or on the web at www.mid-america.us

 

Investing During Periods of Inflation

Investing During Periods of Inflation
What does inflation mean for your investments?

Provided by MidAmerica Financial Resources

 

In August of 2020, the Fed announced that it is willing to allow inflation to run higher than normal in order to support the labor market and broader economy. This major policy shift allows inflation to run above the Fed’s 2% goal for some time before the Fed would consider increasing short-term interest rates in an attempt to combat higher prices.1

 

These robust changes to the Fed’s long-standing inflation policy further illustrates the importance of understanding how inflation is reported and how it can affect your investments.

 

What Is Inflation? Inflation is defined as an upward movement in the average level of prices. Each month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics releases a report called the Consumer Price Index (CPI) to track these fluctuations. It was developed from detailed expenditure information provided by families and individuals on purchases made in the following categories: food and beverages, housing, apparel, transportation, medical care, recreation, education and communication, and other groups and services.2

 

How Applicable Is the CPI? While it’s the commonly used indicator of inflation, the CPI has come under scrutiny. For example, the CPI rose 1.4 percent for the 12-months ending in January 2021 – a relatively small increase. However, a closer look at the report shows movement in prices on a more detailed level. Used car and truck prices, for example, rose 10 percent during those 12 months.3

 

As inflation rises and falls, three notable effects are observed:

 

First, inflation reduces the real rate of return on investments. So, if an investment earned 6 percent for a 12-month period, and inflation averaged 1.5 percent over that time, the investment’s real rate of return would have been 4.5 percent. If taxes are considered, the real rate of return may be reduced even further.4

 

Second, inflation puts purchasing power at risk. When prices rise, a fixed amount of money has the power to purchase fewer and fewer goods.

 

Third, inflation can influence the actions of the Federal Reserve. If the Fed wants to control inflation, it has various methods for reducing the amount of money in circulation. Hypothetically, a smaller supply of money would lead to less spending, which may lead to lower prices and lower inflation.

 

Empower Yourself with a Trusted Professional. When inflation is low, it’s easy to overlook how rising prices are affecting a household budget. On the other hand, when inflation trends higher, it may be tempting to make more sweeping changes in response to increasing prices. The best approach may be to reach out to your financial professional to help you develop an investment strategy that takes both possible scenarios into account.

MidAmerica Financial Resources may be reached at 618.548.4777 or greg.malan@lpl.com www.mid-america.us

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Adviser, Member FINRA/SIPC.
MidAmerica Financial Resources and Malan Financial Group are separate and unrelated companies to LPL.

Citations

  1. CNBC.com, August 27, 2020
  2. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2021
  3. InflationData.com, 2021
  4. This is a hypothetical example used for illustrative purposes only. It is not representative of any specific investment or combination of investments. Past performance does not guarantee future results.

I.R.S. Delays Tax Filing, Payment Deadlines

I.R.S. Delays Tax Filing, Payment Deadlines
The new deadline is May 17, 2021.

Provided by MidAmerica Financial Resources

 

Less than one month ahead of the traditional date, the I.R.S. has delayed the deadline for filing and paying taxes. The new deadline is May 17, 2021. This new deadline also applies to making 2020 contributions to IRAs and Roth IRAs, health savings accounts (HSAs), and Coverdell education savings accounts (Coverdell ESAs).1,2,3

 

The delay follows continued disruption from the COVID-19 pandemic and a late start to the tax-filing season, which the I.R.S. delayed to start on February 12. It also follows the agency’s decision to postpone the deadline to June 15 for the states of Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas, still recovering from disastrous winter storm activity. Other states may now extend their local filing and payment deadlines.1,3

 

This relief does not apply to estimated tax payments that are due on April 15, 2021. These payments are still due on April 15.3

 

While this extension isn’t unexpected, it may be welcome to many still coping with what is becoming one of the most complicated tax seasons in decades.

 

It’s important to point out that our letter is for informational purposes only, so make sure to consult your tax, legal, and accounting professionals before modifying your tax-filing strategy.

 

MidAmerica Financial Resources may be reached at 618.548.4777 or greg.malan@lpl.com www.mid-america.us

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Adviser, Member FINRA/SIPC.
MidAmerica Financial Resources and Malan Financial Group are separate and unrelated companies to LPL.

Citations

  1. CNBC.com, March 17, 2021
  2. Bloomberg.com, March 17, 2021
  3. IRS.gov, March 17, 2021

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